Cancel Culture

Hear How High School Senior Deals With The Abrupt End of High School Career

SPUB members Hannah Smith, 11, Gracey Cowden, 12 and Brianna Gulley, 12, take a picture at Kansas University during the regional journalism competition. School activities such as this one were cancelled for the rest of the school year following the spread of Corona (Photo Submitted by B. Gulley)

SPUB members Hannah Smith, 11, Gracey Cowden, 12 and Brianna Gulley, 12, take a picture at Kansas University during the regional journalism competition. School activities such as this one were cancelled for the rest of the school year following the spread of Corona (Photo Submitted by B. Gulley)

Brianna Gulley, Copy Editor

I think it is pretty safe to say that no one expected this to happen even after learning of the devastation in China. I, much like many people, was not worried about the state of the U.S., for it seemed impossible something like that could happen to us. As the initial fear began to sweep across the U.S., I figured there might be an extended spring break, but I never expected the last quarter of my high school career to be cancelled. Obviously, I am aware high school is not going to be the best time of my whole entire life; however, I am only 17, so technically up until this point senior year has been the best time of my life, and that ending was taken away. 

We all found out over spring break, I had a friend over, and it was a very happy and carefree environment. Suddenly, the mood from that moment shifted to silence as we learned school was cancelled. We could not comprehend the situation, all these things we were looking forward to – prom, graduation – were gone. 

It stings knowing I will be missing out on experiences; I did not attend prom junior year, and I was very much looking forward to prom this year. Prom is not a life-changing event by any means, but to put it bluntly, it is unfair that I may never get the experience that thousands of high schoolers have gotten for so many decades. I am glad the school district is still looking into a summer prom and graduation, but even that is uncertain.

For me, in addition to prom and graduation, I knew I would not be able to compete in the art shows this year, attend spring sports or the school play. Everything I was looking forward to was gone, and there was no way it could be replaced. 

For a few days I did not feel like myself. I felt guilty for being so upset with my problems when people across the world were dying, but I could not reason with the fact that my life, at least for a few months, would be changed. 

I am a person who does not like change; I like the daily schedule of school every week. Those few days after the news broke were very tough for me, but as the first week of online school has started, I have realized this situation may not be ideal, but it is something I will adapt to and overcome. The only dagger for me is the cancellation of events, but I am now able to say I am in the process of getting over it because getting over it is my only option. 

That may sound dark and depressing, but I see this time as a fresh slate, and I will have to make the best with what I have. I am very thankful I still have my family, friends and health; those are things that were not taken away from me, and they have provided me happiness and hope in these times. 

Despite all that has happened, I have been doing a lot of fun activities over this break that have made me very happy, such as playing tennis, FaceTiming friends, re-watching the Harry Potter movies, drawing with sidewalk chalk and playing the new Animal Crossing game. I encourage everyone to find little things like these that make them happy and spend time doing them. It has a great effect on your mental and physical health.

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