From Marching Band to Concert Band

Trumpet players Emily Gehlen, 9, and Gillian King, 9, warming up before their first hour band class, on Dec. 4. They will preform with the band at their concert, Dec. 12 (Photo by R. White)

Trumpet players Emily Gehlen, 9, and Gillian King, 9, warming up before their first hour band class, on Dec. 4. They will preform with the band at their concert, Dec. 12 (Photo by R. White)

Remi White, Staff Writer

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The football game on Oct. 26 marked the end of the Bronco Band’s marching season. The Monday after the 26th, the band got right into concert music. The coming of concert band brings many changes to how the class is taught and the overall atmosphere.

Dan Wooge, the school’s band director, said, “It’s a whole different shift. It’s like changing from football to basketball. It’s a completely different mindset for everyone.”

Some of the main changes come in how the band is supposed to play. Students have to go from a more aggressive tone in marching season to playing more pleasantly for concert band.

The change in seasons will also bring a shift in the student’s attitudes.

“The sound is reflected in the kids’ attitudes. People are way more laid back in here than what we have out on the field,” said Wooge.. “You sorta have to be aggressive on the field.”

This also brings changes to how section leaders lead their sections.

Lily Kuhn, 11, who is the drumline and percussion section leader said, “The drumline is kind of its own entity in band. We have a lot of independence and I kind of have to lead them on a lot of things separate from the band. But then, during concert band, I don’t really have to do any of that.”

The end of marching band also brings the pit and drumline together, two bodies that don’t normally see each other on the field.

The drastic change can also be hard for new members to the high school band. Ashley Paulson, 9, plays piccolo during marching season, but then oboe during concert band. Because of this, she went a long time without having played her oboe.

“It had been a while since I played my oboe. I realized how bad my embouchure [the way the musician applies their mouth to the mouth piece] is when I switched to the double-reeded instrument. It’s much harder to play higher notes,” said Paulson.

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